Online Lecture Series
offered virtually via Zoom and free of charge

2022
Made possible by a gift from Mark and Kathy Helge.

6.16.22
5:30PM

Spot the Mollusk!

By Rebecca Mensch, Senior Marine Biologist
Bailey-Matthews National Shell Museum

Chameleons are frequently touted as having spectacular camouflage skills, but they pale in comparison to the abilities of many mollusks. Some gastropods and bivalves have evolved spectacular shells that don’t just act as a hard barrier, but also help them avoid being seen in their natural surroundings. The cephalopods in particular are the real kings of camouflage, with the ability to change not just shape and texture, but also individual pigment cells. Some mollusks, such as nudibranchs, take a different approach. Armed with toxic defenses, they advertise their presence as a warning to potential predators. Join this virtual lecture with Bailey-Matthews National Shell Museum’s Senior Marine Biologist, Rebecca Mensch, MS, to learn more about (and see!) the fantastic adaptations many mollusks have evolved to deter detection.

About the speaker: Rebecca Mensch completed her B.S. in Marine Biology from Florida Institute of Technology. She completed her Master of Applied Science with Honors from Auckland University of Technology. Her master’s thesis was on the taxonomy of the deep-sea squid genus
Chiroteuthis. During her seven years with the Bailey-Matthews National Shell Museum, Rebecca has had a broad scope of responsibilities including designing and leading in-house and outreach educational programming, identifying and cataloging scientific specimens in the Research Collection, conducting research on the life history of local marine mollusks, curating and caring for the Museum’s live mollusk collection.

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7.13.22
5:30PM

Let's Get Kraken: Cephalopods Coast to Coast

By Bret Grasse, Manager of Cephalopod Operations
Marine Biological Laboratories (Woods Hole, MA)

Cephalopods, which include octopuses, cuttlefish, squids and nautilus, have long fascinated humans.  For centuries, they have provided rich inspiration for our human culture through art, history and fables, technology, and media. 

 

Cephalopods are an evolutionary oddity that include many incredible physical and behavioral capabilities, unique to life on this planet.  They have the largest and most complex brains of any invertebrate, they have unmatched ability to change the color and texture of their skin, they are the fastest aquatic invertebrates, and they can regrow or regenerate entire limbs, to name a few.  This talk will focus on what makes cephalopods so impressive while discussing their presence and role in public aquariums and research communities.  


About the speaker: Bret Grasse has over 15 years of experience in the public aquarium industry. Most notably, Bret served as Senior Aquarist at the Monterey Bay Aquarium for nearly 10 years. During his tenure at the Monterey Bay Aquarium, Bret created and supervised the world’s first ever large-scale cephalopod show, called Tentacles. As part of this exhibition, Bret maintained a diverse collection of cephalopods including 25 species of octopus, 15 species of squid, 10 species of cuttlefish, and nautilus. Bret cultured several of these species through multiple successive generations in aquaria, some for the first time ever. Part of this pioneer work also incorporated the display of several deep-sea cephalopods including vampire squid, glass squid, and flapjack octopus among others.  He has been featured in films such as National Geographic's Man vs. Octopus and BBC's The Octopus in My House as well as consulted for documentary series like BBC's Tiny World, Blue Planet II, and Planet Earth III (future production).

 

In 2017, Bret accepted a job as a Manager of Cephalopod Operations at the internationally renowned Marine Biological Laboratories (MBL) in Woods Hole, MA. Here he will continue his work with cephalopods in a world-class laboratory setting. The primary goal of this mission is to develop sustainable cultures of multiple cephalopod species and work with MBL scientists and educators to promote the use of these animals for research, education, and the conservation of our oceans. 

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8.11.22
5:30PM

Mobilizing Millions of Mollusks of the Eastern Seaboard

By Rüdiger Bieler, PhD
Field Museum of Natural History;
and José H. Leal, PhD, Science Director and Curator
Bailey-Matthews National Shell Museum

Mobilizing Millions of Mollusks of the Eastern Seaboard (ESB) is a collaborative Thematic Collections Network (TCN) project sponsored by the National Science Foundation (NSF) under the Infrastructure Capacity for Biology program of NSF’s Division of Biological Infrastructure.
 
The ESB Project involves 17 of the largest mollusk collections in the US and combines data of over 4.5 million individual specimens from the Atlantic and Gulf States, which will be made available through public online data portals. Adding map coordinates to occurrence records for live-collected mollusks in natural history collections will provide detailed knowledge of distributions. Because natural history collections have specimens collected from the mid-1800s to present, these occurrence records can help track distributional changes over time and lead to better fisheries and conservation management. Drs Leal and Bieler will discuss the project advances and the expected outcomes from this multifaceted cooperative effort.

About the speakers: Dr. Rüdiger Bieler is a marine biologist, specializing in Malacology (the science of mollusks), particularly the study of the comparative morphology, biodiversity, and interrelationships of marine gastropods and bivalves. Dr. Bieler received his M.Sc. and D.Sc. degrees from the University of Hamburg, Germany. After extensive fieldwork in Africa and postdoctoral appointments with the Smithsonian Institution in D.C. and Florida, he held curatorial and administrative positions at the Delaware Museum of Natural History, and joined the Field Museum staff in 1990. In addition to his National Science Foundation-supported research programs, he has served in various administrative roles (including Zoology Department Chair), trains an international group of PhD students, and leads national and international initiatives in evolutionary research and large-scale digitization of biological collections. He is on the faculty of the Committee on Evolutionary Biology at the University of Chicago, was elected president for both the International and the American Societies of Malacology, has served on the Board of Trustees of the Delaware Museum of Natural History, and holds appointments on numerous professional editorial boards. He has published extensively in his chosen fields of research.

José H. Leal, Ph.D. has worked for the Bailey-Matthews National Shell Museum since 1996 and is currently the Science Director and Curator. Dr. Leal received his PhD in Marine Biology and Fisheries from the University of Miami. He has served as an Assistant Editor for Sea Frontiers Magazine, a Visiting Professor at the Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle in Paris, France, and Postdoctoral Fellow at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History. Dr. Leal holds honorary faculty positions at the University of Miami and Florida Gulf Coast University, where he is an affiliate member of the Coastal Watershed Institute. He is also a past president of the American Malacological Society and of Conchologists of America, a past board member of the Florida Association of Museums, an Accreditation Peer Reviewer for the American Alliance of Museums, and editor of The Nautilus. It was through Dr. Leal's leadership that the Museum was awarded accreditation from the American Alliance of Museums in 2010.

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9.14.22
5:30PM

Saving the Queen of the Sea: Queen Conch Conservation Aquaculture

By Megan Davis, Ph.D., Research Professor, Aquaculture and Stock Enhancement Program
Florida Atlantic University Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute

Conservation aquaculture is the farming of fresh and saltwater plants and animals for restoration and food. During this presentation you will learn about Queen Conch aquaculture, which has been Dr. Davis’s focus for the past 40 years. Conchs are a cultural icon of Florida, The Bahamas and the Caribbean where they are found in the shallow seagrass beds and sandy flats. They are known for their beautiful pink lipped shell and harvested as a fishery species for delicacies such as conch chowder, fritters, and salad. You will learn about the life cycle of the Queen Conch, the Conch fishery, and how FAU Harbor Branch has joined with Caribbean partners and communities to aquaculture the Queen Conch for the sake of the species, the ecosystem, and the people who depend on the fishery. 
 
About the speaker: Dr. Davis has worked in the field of aquaculture for over four decades and has led several team projects throughout the Caribbean and Florida. Her passion for the ocean began as a young girl collecting shells along the beaches of her native Australia and sailing many summers in The Bahamas with her family. She spent 10 years in the Turks and Caicos Islands as co-founder and chief scientist for the world’s largest Queen Conch farm. Davis and her team work on Queen Conch restoration and conservation community partnership projects in Florida, The Bahamas, Puerto Rico and other locations in the Caribbean. See www.conchaquaculture.org for more information and follow Dr. Davis on Instagram @queenconchlab for regular updates on the projects.

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10.13.22
5:30PM

Land Snails in Los Angeles: An Experiment in Urban Citizen Science

By Dr. Jann Elizabeth Vendetti, Associate Curator and Twila Bratcher Chair in Malacology
Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County

The land snail and slug fauna of Los Angeles County, like that of many other metropolitan areas, is under-surveyed and under-studied. To address this shortfall, in 2015 the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County began a citizen/community science project called SLIME (Snails and Slugs Living in Metropolitan Environments), focused on the terrestrial malacofauna from Southern California. As of early 2022, there have been more than 18,000 observations added to the project and approximately 100 species documented. Results have included first occurrence records for several species within Southern California counties and the documentation of range extents and limits of native and introduced taxa.
 

The outreach aspect of the project has engaged students and school groups, museum associates and members, and other community groups. The success of SLIME has been replicated with similar iNaturalist projects elsewhere in the U.S., including in Atlanta, Georgia and Seattle, Washington. In this talk, Dr. Vendetti will share highlights and insights of building a successful citizen science movement in the nation's largest urban area, and surprising discoveries about land snail and slug species in Los Angeles.

About the speaker: Jann Vendetti is Associate Curator of Malacology at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County and the co-director of the Museum's Urban Nature Research Center. She is interested in the natural history, evolution, systematics, and conservation of marine and terrestrial snails. Jann joined the museum in 2014 and has focused on collections-based research and the Snails and slugs Living in Metropolitan Environments (SLIME) project, championing the important role of citizen/community science to understanding terrestrial gastropod biodiversity. Jann earned her Ph.D. from UC Berkeley's Department of Integrative Biology and Museum of Paleontology, and had a postdoctoral fellowship at California State University, Los Angeles, which was partially funded by a Smithsonian Encyclopedia of Life Rubenstein Fellowship. 

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2021

2.25.21
5PM

Southwest Florida's Water Quality Challenges and the Urgent Need to Complete Everglades Restoration

By James Evans, Environmental Policy Director, Sanibel-Captiva Conservation Foundation

About the speaker: James Evans is Environmental Policy Director for SCCF. As Policy Director, he is responsible for interpreting science to create, inform, and advance environmental policy in Southwest Florida. He holds a bachelor’s degree in Environmental Studies and a master’s degree in Environmental Science from Florida Gulf Coast University. James has more than 20 years of experience working on water resource issues and Everglades restoration. Prior to joining SCCF, James was the Director of Natural Resources for the City of Sanibel and was the primary author of the Caloosahatchee Watershed Regional Water Management Issues white paper—a document outlining short-and long-term strategies to address the freshwater discharges from Lake Okeechobee and the Caloosahatchee watershed.

James’ presentation will explore Florida's water quality issues from the state, regional, and local perspectives, focusing on the impact water quality is having here in Southwest Florida. He will discuss the factors contributing to poor water quality and harmful algal blooms─such as blue-green algae and red tide─and how harmful algal blooms in 2018 impacted the ecology of our coastal waters and Sanibel’s local economy. I will also discuss the relationship between our water quality issues and the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP) and how CERP will help restore the quality, quantity, timing and distribution of freshwater flows delivered to the Caloosahatchee estuary.

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3.25.21
5PM

Shells and Bad Water:
Ocean Acidification and its Effects on Mollusks​

Dr. Leal will discuss the some of the most recent finds and facts about the influence of ocean acidification on mollusks. Mollusks are small, slow-moving, slimy creatures that are barely noticed by most people. But there is much more to them than just a trail of slime or pretty empty shells. Mollusks are the second most diverse group of animals on Earth. There are at least 75,000 known species of mollusks, of which around 60% are marine. They are present in virtually all of Earth’s natural environments and ecosystems, including deserts, cold mountain springs, rainforests, and the deepest ocean trenches. They are important links in the oceans’ food webs. And, given the close association between accelerated increases in dissolved carbon dioxide (ocean acidification) and the chemical processes involved in shell growth, mollusks are probably the earliest to be affected by that human-induced phenomenon. 

Ocean acidification is caused by the increased uptake of atmospheric carbon dioxide by sea water. More acidic sea water affects the shells of planktonic (open-water) mollusks, thinning and opening holes in those delicate structures. Acidification is already a tangible threat to several species of planktonic mollusks, including sea butterflies (pteropods), which are key links in open-ocean food webs, serving as food for many species of fish, which in turn feed larger animals such as sea birds, whales, and even polar bears. Recent research also shows, for instance, that the small, delicate larval shells of larger species are adversely affected. Minute increases in the oceans’ acidity going forward will certainly prove to be harmful to large numbers of species of molluscan species.

About the speaker: José H. Leal, Ph.D. has worked for the Bailey-Matthews National Shell Museum since 1996 and is currently the Science Director and Curator. Dr. Leal received his PhD in Marine Biology and Fisheries from the University of Miami. He has served as an Assistant Editor for Sea Frontiers Magazine, a Visiting Professor at the Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle in Paris, France, and Postdoctoral Fellow at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History. Dr. Leal holds honorary faculty positions at the University of Miami and Florida Gulf Coast University, where he is an affiliate member of the Coastal Watershed Institute. He is also a past president of the American Malacological Society and of Conchologists of America, a past board member of the Florida Association of Museums, an Accreditation Peer Reviewer for the American Alliance of Museums, and editor of The Nautilus. It was through Dr. Leal's leadership that the Museum was awarded accreditation from the American Alliance of Museums in 2010.

By José H. Leal, Ph.D., Science Director and Curator, Bailey-Matthews National Shell Museum 

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4.22.21
5PM

About the speaker: Cynthia Barnett is an environmental author and journalist who has covered water and climate stories around the world. She is the author of three books including Rain: A Natural and Cultural History, longlisted for the National Book Award, a finalist for the PEN/E.O. Wilson Award for Literary Science Writing, and named among the best nonfiction books of 2015 by NPR’s Science Friday, the Boston Globe, the Tampa Bay Times, the Miami Herald and others. She has written for National Geographic, the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, the Wall Street Journal, the Atlantic, Discover magazine, and many other publications. She is Environmental Journalist in Residence at the University of Florida College of Journalism and Communications.

Blue Revolution:
A Water Ethic for America and Florida

Join us for a special Earth Day program with award-winning Environmental Journalist Cynthia Barnett. Water defines us as Floridians no matter where we live: Idyllic beaches surround us on three sides. Rivers and streams flow for ten thousand miles through the peninsula. We’re blessed with nearly eight thousand lakes and a thousand more freshwater springs – the largest concentration of artesian springs in the world. Florida’s economy and idyllic lifestyle are built on a foundation of pure and plentiful water. Yet the latest generation of Floridians has not inherited waters as clean and abundant as when they were born. In “Blue Revolution: A Water Ethic for America & Florida,” Barnett explores how one of the most water-rich states in the nation could come to face water quality and scarcity woes—and how it doesn’t have to be this way. With a shared ethic for water, Floridians come together to use less and pollute less, and work with nature as we prepare for sea-rise and the other tremors of a changing climate. Cynthia ends her talk with the first sneak peek at her new book The Sound of the Sea: Seashells and the Fate of the Oceans, which she describes as inspired by the Bailey-Matthews National Shell Museum and Sanibel Island.

By Cynthia Barnett, Award-Winning Environmental Journalist 

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6.15.21
5PM

About the speakers: Kory Rogers is the Francie and John Downing Senior Curator of American Art at Shelburne Museum, in Shelburne, Vermont, where he oversees more than 100,000 works of art and design ranging from the 18th century to the present day. Kory’s professional interests include: the American circus, wildfowl decoys, English ceramics, 19th-century horse-drawn vehicles, 20th-century and contemporary furniture design, and of course seashells. Kory earned his M.A. in the history of American decorative arts from the joint program between Smithsonian Associates, Parson School of Design and New School University in 2003.

Jean M. Burks is Curator Emerita of Shelburne Museum, where, for 20 years, she was responsible for 18th-20th-century American and European decorative arts. Prior to this, she held Curatorial positions at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Winterthur Museum, the National Museum of Play, and Canterbury Shaker Village. Jean received her M.A. in the history of decorative arts from the Smithsonian Institution/Parsons School of Design in New York City. After retiring to Sanibel, Jean spends her time shelling as well as volunteering on the beaches as a Shell Ambassador and in the Collections Department of the Bailey-Matthews National Shell Museum.

Artistic Adaptations:
2,000 Years of Seashells in Art

For Millenia, shells have provided artists with inspiration. Whether physically incorporated, stylistically interpreted or scientifically rendered, land and marine mollusks appear as important motifs or primary subject matter in diverse works of art. From Ancient Rome to Louis Comfort Tiffany, this program will explore the surprising interpretation of bivalves and gastropods in paintings, furniture, ceramics, glass, and metalwork historically. Accomplished art museum curators, good friends, and shell collectors and enthusiasts Jean Burks and Kory Rogers are the speakers for this program. This talk is the first of a short Artistic Adaptations series over the coming months that will also feature shells in adornment (jewelry and clothing) and architecture.

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By Jean M. Burks, Curator Emerita, Shelburne Museum, and Kory Rogers, Francie and John Downing Senior Curator of American Art, Shelburne Museum 

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Curator’s Choice: New Photographs of Extraordinary Shells, and the Digital Imaging Project at the National Shell Museum

6.29.21
5PM

Dr. José H. Leal presents a selection of exceptional images from the new exhibition In Focus: Precision Photography of Extraordinary and Uncommon Shells which recently opened at the Bailey-Matthews National Shell Museum and is on view through November 28th. Dr. Leal will discuss his choices of images, the different groups of species represented and their unique qualities, and special photographic techniques adopted to ensure a high level of richness and detail. He will also discuss the Digital Imaging Project, for which the photographs have been made, and its global scope and impact for scholars, scientists, and enthusiasts of shells and mollusks. For more information about the In Focus: Precision Photography of Extraordinary and Uncommon Shells exhibition, please click here.

About the speaker: José H. Leal, Ph.D. has worked for the Bailey-Matthews National Shell Museum since 1996 and is currently the Science Director and Curator. Dr. Leal received his PhD in Marine Biology and Fisheries from the University of Miami. He has served as an Assistant Editor for Sea Frontiers Magazine, a Visiting Professor at the Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle, and Postdoctoral Fellow at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History. Dr. Leal holds honorary faculty positions at the University of Miami and Florida Gulf Coast University, where he is an affiliate member of the Coastal Watershed Institute. He is also a past president of the American Malacological Society and of Conchologists of America, a past board member of the Florida Association of Museums, an Accreditation Peer Reviewer for the American Alliance of Museums, and editor of The Nautilus. It was through Dr. Leal's leadership that the Museum was awarded accreditation from the American Alliance of Museums in 2010.

By José H. Leal, Ph.D., Science Director and Curator, Bailey-Matthews National Shell Museum 

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7.13.21
5PM

About the speaker: Melissa A. May, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor of Marine Biology at Florida Gulf Coast University. She has been studying the effects of environmental stress, such as salinity, temperature, and food, on marine mussels and their larvae since 2010. She finished her PhD from the University of Maine in 2017 and, following a postdoctoral research fellowship at California Polytechnic State University, moved to Southwest Florida in August 2020. She since has begun an oyster monitoring program in Estero Bay and hopes to help better understand how oysters tolerate changes in their environment. Melissa is an avid marine invertebrate biologist and her favorite shelled animal is the lined chiton, Tonicella lineata.

Oysters: A Crystal Ball for Water Quality in Southwest Florida

Dr. Melissa May leads Florida Gulf Coast University’s oyster monitoring research program in Estero Bay. Oysters are mollusks and essential members of coastal water ecosystems. These shelled animals play an important role in the health of water, and their reefs provide homes and food for other marine animals. They act as indicators for declines in water quality or other stressors imposed on estuarine ecosystems and help to clean the water by filtering large volumes of water through their shells. Dr. May’s talk will focus on the range of threats to the health of oysters and other mollusks in Southwest Florida (in addition to freshwater releases from Lake Okeechobee), with an emphasis on her new research program in Estero Bay.

By Melissa A. May, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Marine Biology, Florida Gulf Coast University

7.27.21
5PM

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About the speaker: Rebecca Mensch completed her B.S. in Marine Biology from Florida Institute of Technology. She completed her Master of Applied Science with Honors from Auckland University of Technology. Her master’s thesis was on the taxonomy of the deep-sea squid genus Chiroteuthis. During her seven years with the Bailey-Matthews National Shell Museum, Rebecca has had a broad scope of responsibilities including designing and leading in-house and outreach educational programming, identifying and cataloging scientific specimens in the Research Collection, conducting research on the life history of local marine mollusks, curating and caring for the Museum’s live mollusk collection.

Supersized Squid

Join squid expert Rebecca Mensch as she presents about the Giant Squid and the Colossal Squid. For millennia the Giant Squid has captured the imagination and inspired tales of sea beasts such as the kraken. Because of the extreme depths these magnificent mollusks live in, many questions about these animals have gone unanswered until the last two decades. With recent advances in technology, many mysteries of these two extraordinary mollusks are finally beginning to be revealed, but there is still much to learn. Rebecca shares new findings and images to tell the unique story of the Supersized Squid.

By Rebecca Mensch, Senior Marine Biologist, Bailey-Matthews National Shell Museum 

8.24.21
5PM

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About the speaker: Kenneth Sassaman is the Hyatt and Cici Brown Professor of Florida Archaeology at the University of Florida. He specializes in the Archaic and Woodland periods of the American Southeast, technological change, and community patterning. Since arriving in Florida in 1998, Ken spent most summers in the middle St. Johns River valley of northeast Florida, where he and his students investigated the region’s oldest shell mounds. In 2009 he launched the Lower Suwannee Archaeological Survey on the northern Gulf coast of Florida to investigate a record of maritime living that continues to be diminished by rising seas. Relating the experiences of indigenous coastal dwellers over the past 5,000 years to contemporary challenges of sea-level rise is among the project’s chief goals.

8,000 Years of Shells in the American Southeast: Archaeological Insights on the Ecology, Diet, Architecture, and Ritual of Ancient Native Americans

Ancestors of Native Americans began collecting freshwater shellfish in large numbers about 8,000 years ago. Marine shellfishing may have begun even earlier, but rising sea since the end of the Ice Age inundated the archaeological remains of coastal dwelling before about 5,000 years ago, when the rate of sea-level rise slowed. Beyond the value of shellfish meat to ancient diets, the inedible shells provided construction material for mounds, causeways, fish traps, and more. In addition, shells were valued as a ritual medium. Beads, gorgets, and ceremonial vessels made from shell attest to cosmological connections among water, earth, and sky, and between the living and the dead. This overview of 8,000 years of dwelling in the American Southeast explores the myriad ways that shell structured the histories of ancient Native Americans.

By Kenneth E. Sassaman, Hyatt and Cici Brown Professor of Florida Archaeology, University of Florida

About the speaker: Dan Killam, Ph.D. is a postdoctoral researcher at Biosphere 2, University of Arizona. He is a paleontologist specializing in comparing the geochemistry of fossil and modern mollusk shells. After completing his undergraduate degree in Environmental Studies at USC and a Ph.D. in Earth Science at UC Santa Cruz, Dan spent over a year studying bittersweet clams at the University of Haifa in Israel before beginning his current project culturing giant clams at Biosphere 2. Dan is passionate about conservation, natural history and science communication. In his free time, he enjoys hiking in the Tucson desert looking for creatures to post to iNaturalist, and at home hangs out with his cat, hermit crab and carnivorous plants.

Giant clams are special among bivalve mollusks in using symbiotic algae within their bodies to speed up their growth, like corals do, yet little is understood of how they will fare in the face of climate change and ocean acidification. To look into the future and explore these questions further, researcher Dan Killam is growing smooth giant clams in a 700,000-gallon coral reef tank of the Biosphere 2 in Arizona to understand how they manage to grow their shells so quickly. In the Biosphere 2 “ocean”, juvenile giant clams have more than doubled in size in just one year and will eventually reach two feet long. 

The controlled conditions of the Biosphere 2 ocean reef tank provide a perfect setting to explore and experiment. As with corals, the partnership between giant clams and their internal algae only works within a narrow range of temperatures and pH levels. As the oceans grow warmer and more acidic, this relationship will be put under stress, reducing their growth. In this talk, Dan will share insights from his groundbreaking research on the impacts of changing oceans on mollusks, featuring images and video of the singular Biosphere 2 facility. 

By Dan Killam, Ph.D., Biosphere 2,
University of Arizona

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9.16.21
5PM

Why Am I Growing Giant Clams in the Middle of the Arizona Desert?

By Jean M. Burks, Curator Emerita, Shelburne Museum, and Kory Rogers, Francie and John Downing Senior Curator of American Art, Shelburne Museum 

9.28.21
5PM

About the speakers: Kory Rogers is the Francie and John Downing Senior Curator of American Art at Shelburne Museum, in Shelburne, Vermont, where he oversees more than 100,000 works of art and design ranging from the 18th century to the present day. Kory’s professional interests include: the American circus, wildfowl decoys, English ceramics, 19th-century horse-drawn vehicles, 20th-century and contemporary furniture design, and of course seashells. Kory earned his M.A. in the history of American decorative arts from the joint program between Smithsonian Associates, Parson School of Design and New School University in 2003.

Jean M. Burks is Curator Emerita of Shelburne Museum, where, for 20 years, she was responsible for 18th-20th-century American and European decorative arts. Prior to this, she held Curatorial positions at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Winterthur Museum, the National Museum of Play, and Canterbury Shaker Village. Jean received her M.A. in the history of decorative arts from the Smithsonian Institution/Parsons School of Design in New York City. After retiring to Sanibel, Jean spends her time shelling as well as volunteering on the beaches as a Shell Ambassador and in the Collections Department of the Bailey-Matthews National Shell Museum.

Shell Dressed:
Seashells in Fashion and Jewelry

Following their successful June lecture about shells in art, curators Jean Burks and Kory Rogers return with a new presentation to explore how mollusks are incorporated and interpreted in items of personal adornment throughout history. From Cleopatra to Alexander McQueen, classic cameos to contemporary creations, shells have been adored by celebrities, commoners and cultures around the world. Whether used as a dye for ancient royal garments or embroidered to a contemporary evening gown, threaded on string or set in precious metals, seashells have played an important and varied role in the design and production of fashion and fashion accessories for thousands of years. 

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10.20.21
5PM

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About the speaker: José H. Leal, Ph.D. has worked for the Bailey-Matthews National Shell Museum since 1996 and is currently the Science Director and Curator. Dr. Leal received his PhD in Marine Biology and Fisheries from the University of Miami. He has served as an Assistant Editor for Sea Frontiers Magazine, a Visiting Professor at the Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle in Paris, France, and Postdoctoral Fellow at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History. Dr. Leal holds honorary faculty positions at the University of Miami and Florida Gulf Coast University, where he is an affiliate member of the Coastal Watershed Institute. He is also a past president of the American Malacological Society and of Conchologists of America, a past board member of the Florida Association of Museums, an Accreditation Peer Reviewer for the American Alliance of Museums, and editor of The Nautilus. It was through Dr. Leal's leadership that the Museum was awarded accreditation from the American Alliance of Museums in 2010.

Spooky Mollusks and Other Evils
of the Deep: A Halloween Special 

To celebrate Halloween and in genuine vampire-seeking fashion, Dr. José H. Leal will unmask the shocking lifestyles of ghastly and bloodcurdling mollusks. Get acquainted with vampire squid and snails, clams that live entombed for life, grave-robbing and corpse-eating snails, parasitic micromollusks addicted to blood, and other harrowing creatures of the molluscan universe. And good luck sleeping after that!   

By José H. Leal, Ph.D., Science Director and Curator, Bailey-Matthews National Shell Museum